Category

breakfast

If you are thinking about giving your friends edible gifts for the holidays this year, you should include this granola. It is inspired by a lebkuchen chocolate that I tried recently. I had no idea that lebkuchen (the German version of gingerbread) and chocolate go together so well, especially if the chocolate is a rich, dark one. The warm spices and the aromatic chocolate complement each other so well! Seriously, we should put lebkuchen spices and chocolate into everything and have it for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Okay, well. Maybe let’s start with breakfast and snacks. Because this warming, crunchy, and fragrant granola that comes with a decent helping of chocolate and roasted nuts is quite addictive. You are probably going to snack on it all day long. And a word of warning if you are planning on giving this away as a present: Make a double batch or you might feel tempted to keep it all for yourself.

Lebkuchen Chocolate Granola

The recipe is very versatile. If you don’t have dark agave nectar, you can use maple or rice syrup. Instead of the brown sugar, you can use coconut sugar or whatever you like. Instead of hazelnuts use almonds or pecans. It really doesn’t matter as long as they are roasted. Gluten-free flakes should be fine, too. For the spices I used a store bought lebkuchen blend but a gingerbread blend works just as well. If you are looking for an authentic lebkuchen blend though and cannot find one, please check out my e-book. There is a recipe on page 6. (As well as a spekulatius blend. That works just as well and will probably make this even better!)

A little note on the salt: I went for a whole 1/2 teaspoon and I thought this really added to the flavour and made the granola even better. But feel free to reduce it to 1/4 teaspoon.

 

Lebkuchen Chocolate Granola

Lebkuchen Chocolate Granola

5 cups

Ingredients

250 g (2 1/2 cups) rolled oats
50 g (1/4 cup) brown sugar
64 g (1/4 cup) almond butter
2 teaspoons lebkuchen spice
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 - 1/2 teaspoon salt
60 ml (1/4 cup) rapeseed oil
60 ml (1/4 cup) dark agave nectar
60 g (1/3 cup) hazelnuts, chopped
100 g (3.5 oz) dark rice milk chocolate or semisweet chocolate, finely chopped

Instructions

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and preheat your oven to 200°C (400°F).

Combine all ingredients except for hazelnuts and chocolate and mix well.

Spread on the baking sheet and bake for 5 minutes.

Add hazelnuts, mix well adn bake for another 7 minutes.

Remove from heat and mix in chocolate.

When the chocolate is melted (after 2-3 minutes) mix again and let cool completely.

Transfer to a glass jar.

http://www.seitanismymotor.com/2016/11/lebkuchen-chocolate-granola/

Lebkuchen Chocolate Granola

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Welcome back to the quest for the ultimate vegan croissant. (Find part one with tips and tricks here. Please read if you want to make this recipe.) Writing these two posts down and taking all these pictures took almos as long as making the actual croissants. But once in a while I really love to splurge on these things. Because after all baking and blogging are my favourite things to do. I am super lucky that I can afford to spend an afternoon here and there working on my blog projects and I really hope thse instructions are useful for one or two of you.

But let’s get right into it and start baking! For both versions (margarine and coconut oil) we will start with a basic dough that you have to prepare the night before you want to bake your croissants. A long rest and slow rise in the fridge will help the dough develop flavour.

vegan croissants with margarine or coconut oil

Although you can use all-purpose flour with no problem, I’ve found that white spelt flour (German type 630) works better with the coconut oil version. It is a bit stretchier than all purpose flour. That means the croissant dough is easier  to roll out. But as I said, all-purpose flour will be fine, if you don’t have white spelt on hand.

Also, as always I encourage you to experiment! My recipe is only a suggestion and maybe you will get better results with the coconut oil version, if you leave out the flour for the filling or choose a sturdier flour (like all-purpose or bread flour). You never know. I am not a trained chef and am figuring out these things out as I go. If you experiment with this recipe (or have experimented with croissants), please let me know and leave a comment.

vegan croissants with margarine or coconut oil

Croissants are some of the foods many of us take for granted. They seem like a lot of work, so we just buy them at the bakery. Yeah. That is unless when you are vegan. No croissants for those butter despisers, right. Because croissants need butter.

Actually they don’t. I used to make them with margarine all the time. And look how they turn out! If you use the right kind of margarine (In Germany that is Alsan) you won’t even miss the butter.These days I don’t use margarine any longer. I bought a package to make croissants again and I still think commercial margarine will give you better results than any other fat.* It has the right mixture of fats that will melt at different temperatures. And it has water, which is so important for the croissant layers to form. (The water will evaporate during baking and leave little air pockets.) Coconut oil just won’t do that which makes the croissant layers merge into each other.

I was quite sure I wanted to take part in the Vegan Month of Food again. It’s the most exhausting part of the year for us vegan bloggers. But it’s also the most exiting. Like good old times when reading and writing blogs wasn’t outdated yet. Last year I quit halfway through, I couldn’t keep up with my ambitious German Desserts II theme. This year I wanted to do something else, but I didn’t know what. But someone at the MoFo headquarters must have read my mind. For this year they made new guidelines and came up with a list of 30 themes, one for each day of September. I absolutely love this idea, it’s great to have some help and inspiration! I am also looking forward to what other people come up with for these themes. I still consider my blogging about German food at this kind of the year as a tradition, so I will try to loosely stick with it as well.

But now let’s get started! This is today’s theme:

Rise and Shine: Breakfast MoFo Edition | seitanismymotor.com

When people ask me about my vegan diet, they don’t ask me, “Where do you get your protein?” They ask me “What do you eat for breakfast?” instead. In Germany breakfast is important, but it’s also the meal most people try not to put too much work into. So the main component of a German breakfast is bread. People eat Schnitte, Butterbrot or Brötchen. Butterbrot is a concept that most of you probably know from the Muppet Show, where it’s called smörrebröd. Schnitte is a noun derived from the verb schneiden, which means “to cut”. It refers to bread slices. Brötchen are like rolls. You spread them with butter and then decide if you want jam, cheese, or cold cuts on top. You see the problem there? If you’re vegan all you can put on your brötchen is plain jam. Or at least that’s what people think and that is why they throw me a commiserationg look and ask me about my breakfast. Which is weird, because by now there are tons of vegan spreads, cheeses, and cold cuts available. There’s lots of variety, but most of these foods can also be a bit costly. A much cheaper way to eat breakfast is müsli. And that is what I am having almost every single day. Germans don’t bother with cooking oats or pre-soaking them or whatever you can do to increase preparation time. We simply pour some milk and eat. (I swear there is soymilk in that bowl. It just got soaked up while I took the picture.) I usually add flax seeds or some other seeds like pumpkin or sunflower and one or two fruits. But much more importantly, I’ll have a coffee first thing in the morning. Otherwise I’m not even able to find the fridge.

Rise and Shine: Breakfast MoFo Edition | seitanismymotor.com