Category

Frühstück

If you are thinking about giving your friends edible gifts for the holidays this year, you should include this granola. It is inspired by a lebkuchen chocolate that I tried recently. I had no idea that lebkuchen (the German version of gingerbread) and chocolate go together so well, especially if the chocolate is a rich, dark one. The warm spices and the aromatic chocolate complement each other so well! Seriously, we should put lebkuchen spices and chocolate into everything and have it for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Okay, well. Maybe let’s start with breakfast and snacks. Because this warming, crunchy, and fragrant granola that comes with a decent helping of chocolate and roasted nuts is quite addictive. You are probably going to snack on it all day long. And a word of warning if you are planning on giving this away as a present: Make a double batch or you might feel tempted to keep it all for yourself.

Lebkuchen Chocolate Granola

The recipe is very versatile. If you don’t have dark agave nectar, you can use maple or rice syrup. Instead of the brown sugar, you can use coconut sugar or whatever you like. Instead of hazelnuts use almonds or pecans. It really doesn’t matter as long as they are roasted. Gluten-free flakes should be fine, too. For the spices I used a store bought lebkuchen blend but a gingerbread blend works just as well. If you are looking for an authentic lebkuchen blend though and cannot find one, please check out my e-book. There is a recipe on page 6. (As well as a spekulatius blend. That works just as well and will probably make this even better!)

A little note on the salt: I went for a whole 1/2 teaspoon and I thought this really added to the flavour and made the granola even better. But feel free to reduce it to 1/4 teaspoon.

 

Lebkuchen Chocolate Granola

Lebkuchen Chocolate Granola

5 cups

Ingredients

250 g (2 1/2 cups) rolled oats
50 g (1/4 cup) brown sugar
64 g (1/4 cup) almond butter
2 teaspoons lebkuchen spice
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 - 1/2 teaspoon salt
60 ml (1/4 cup) rapeseed oil
60 ml (1/4 cup) dark agave nectar
60 g (1/3 cup) hazelnuts, chopped
100 g (3.5 oz) dark rice milk chocolate or semisweet chocolate, finely chopped

Instructions

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and preheat your oven to 200°C (400°F).

Combine all ingredients except for hazelnuts and chocolate and mix well.

Spread on the baking sheet and bake for 5 minutes.

Add hazelnuts, mix well adn bake for another 7 minutes.

Remove from heat and mix in chocolate.

When the chocolate is melted (after 2-3 minutes) mix again and let cool completely.

Transfer to a glass jar.

http://www.seitanismymotor.com/2016/11/lebkuchen-chocolate-granola/

Lebkuchen Chocolate Granola

Merken

Merken

Merken

Merken

Merken

Merken

Merken

Welcome back to the quest for the ultimate vegan croissant. (Find part one with tips and tricks here. Please read if you want to make this recipe.) Writing these two posts down and taking all these pictures took almos as long as making the actual croissants. But once in a while I really love to splurge on these things. Because after all baking and blogging are my favourite things to do. I am super lucky that I can afford to spend an afternoon here and there working on my blog projects and I really hope thse instructions are useful for one or two of you.

But let’s get right into it and start baking! For both versions (margarine and coconut oil) we will start with a basic dough that you have to prepare the night before you want to bake your croissants. A long rest and slow rise in the fridge will help the dough develop flavour.

vegan croissants with margarine or coconut oil

Although you can use all-purpose flour with no problem, I’ve found that white spelt flour (German type 630) works better with the coconut oil version. It is a bit stretchier than all purpose flour. That means the croissant dough is easier  to roll out. But as I said, all-purpose flour will be fine, if you don’t have white spelt on hand.

Also, as always I encourage you to experiment! My recipe is only a suggestion and maybe you will get better results with the coconut oil version, if you leave out the flour for the filling or choose a sturdier flour (like all-purpose or bread flour). You never know. I am not a trained chef and am figuring out these things out as I go. If you experiment with this recipe (or have experimented with croissants), please let me know and leave a comment.

vegan croissants with margarine or coconut oil

Croissants are some of the foods many of us take for granted. They seem like a lot of work, so we just buy them at the bakery. Yeah. That is unless when you are vegan. No croissants for those butter despisers, right. Because croissants need butter.

Actually they don’t. I used to make them with margarine all the time. And look how they turn out! If you use the right kind of margarine (In Germany that is Alsan) you won’t even miss the butter.These days I don’t use margarine any longer. I bought a package to make croissants again and I still think commercial margarine will give you better results than any other fat.* It has the right mixture of fats that will melt at different temperatures. And it has water, which is so important for the croissant layers to form. (The water will evaporate during baking and leave little air pockets.) Coconut oil just won’t do that which makes the croissant layers merge into each other.

I am a language nerd. I spent this morning looking up why rhubarb, or rhabarber in German, is written with an h after the r. The latin word for rhubarb is rheum barbarus. Barbarus means foreign. Rheum is derived from the ancient greek rheu, and that’s where the h comes from. It indicates a certain pronunciation of the letter rho at the beginning of a word. Not that interesting? Alright. While I was looking all of this up I found some funny sentences in the book On Food and Cooking by Harold McGee (highly recommended, by the way). On page 317 McGee writes that rhubarb’s “main use in the West is as a tart stand-in for fruit”. On page 367 he adds that rhubarb “often masquerates as fruit”. Both statements sound kind of mean, as if rhubarb stalks would sneak into our kitchens, drag the strawberries out of a pie and take their place only to dupe us. But I guess McGee has a point, because he also explains that rhubarb only became popular in pies and other sweet foods after sugar had become affordable. Since then it has been treated like a fruit and made palatable in desserts with tons of sweetener. But then it’s not the rhubarb that dupes us here. It’s the sugar. (See, sugar is bad.)

Last Sunday we were enjoying our last rhubarb stalks, baked into a crisp, which is basically nothing else than a very, very lazy pie. This is a simple and versatile recipe and almost every ingredient could be substituted with something else. I used coconut flour, but oat flour or even whole wheat flour would work. For the almond butter you could use any other nut butter as well. Oh, and if you don’t have rhubarb, use berries or even apples. I used a 22 cm bread pan (9-inch loaf pan) for this recipe, and that makes enough for three people. P complained that the filling wasn’t sweet enough. He’s probably right but it’s no problem to double the amount of sugar mixed with the rhubarb.

rhubarb crisp | seitanismymotor.com

Simple Rhubarb Crisp

Ingredients

400 g (3 1/3 cups) thinly sliced rhubarb
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1/4 cup agave nectar or sugar (double for a sweeter version)
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
60 g (1/2 cup) old fashioned rolled oats
50 g (1/4 cup) brown sugar
30 g (1/4 cup) coconut flour (substitute oat or whole wheat flour)
60 ml (1/4 cup) oil
2 tablespoons almond butter (any nut butter is fine)
1/4 teaspoon salt

Instructions

Preheat oven to 200°C (400°F)

Place rhubarb, cornstarch, and agave nectar in a 22 cm (9 inch) loaf pan and stir to combine.

Combine remaining ingredients and stir well. Sprinkle on top of rhubarb.

Bake for 20 minutes or until the rhubarb is soft and the topping crispy.

Serve warm or cold.

http://www.seitanismymotor.com/2015/06/simple-rhubarb-crisp/