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Welcome back to another day of Vegan Mofo 2015. Best sandwich ever? Ar you kidding me? I don’t have best sandwich recipe ever, but I have a best sandwiches ever book. Vegan Sandwiches Save the Day came out three years ago and I still use it on a regular basis. It’s been a life saver during this crazy hot summer, even though many recipes call for baking or frying something. But it’s easy to make a lot of things in advance and have them handy once you get super hungry and don’t feel like preparing an elaborate meal. The following recipe shares the title “Best Sandwich Ever” with several other recipes in this book by Celine Steen and Tamasin Noyes and it has been on our plates several times since the book came out. I love that there are two different marinades, which are also very flexible. Instead of Cajun spice mix I have used curry or berbere. Both the tofu and the eggplant slices make a lot. I usually store them in the fridge and use them as sides for other dishes as well. (If you cut the tofu into slices thinner than 1/4 inch.)

marinated eggplant sandwich | Vegan MoFo 2015

Marinated Eggpland Sandwich {Vegan Sandwiches Save the Day}

4 Sandwiches

Ingredients

For marinated eggplant
1 small (14 ounces, or 400 g) eggplant, cut in half widthwise, then cut lengthwise into 1/4-inch (6-mm)-thick slices
1/4 cup (60 ml) olive oil, divided
2 tablespoons (30 ml) apple cider vinegar
2 teaspoons Cajun spice mix
2 teaspoons vegan Worcestershire sauce
1/2 teaspoon liquid smoke
For tofu
1/4 cup (60 ml) white balsamic vinegar
2 tablespoons (30 ml) olive oil
2 tablespoons (15 g) nutritional yeast
1 teaspoon onion powder
2 cloves garlic, pressed
Salt and pepper, to taste
1 pound (454 g) super-firm or extra-firm tofu, drained, pressed, and cut lengthwise into four 1/4-inch (6-mm) steaks
For sandwiches
1/2 cup (112 g) vegan mayonnaise
4 sub sandwich rolls or mini baguettes, 6 inches (15 cm) long, cut in half and lightly toasted
1 1/3 cups (96 g) shredded lettuce

Instructions

To make the marinated eggplant: Preheat the broiler to 450°F (230°C, or gas mark 8).

Place the eggplant on one or two large baking sheets.

In a small bowl, combine 2 tablespoons (30 ml) of the olive oil with the vinegar and Cajun spice mix.

Lightly brush this mixture on both sides of the eggplant slices.

Broil for 4 minutes on each side, or until dark brown.

In the meantime, in another small bowl, combine the remaining 2 tablespoons (30 ml) olive oil with the Worcestershire sauce and liquid smoke.

Carefully remove the baking sheet from the oven.

Brush both sides of the eggplant slices with the Worcestershire mixture and let them cool on a wire rack.

Let stand for at least 30 minutes before serving, or even better, up to overnight.

Store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 4 days.

To get the best out of the flavors, bring back to room temperature before serving.

To make the tofu: Combine the vinegar, oil, nutritional yeast, onion powder, garlic, salt, and pepper in a large rectangular shallow dish.

Add the tofu and turn to coat thoroughly; let marinate for 30 minutes.

Decrease the oven temperature to 425°F (220°C, or gas mark 7).

Bake the tofu for 30 minutes, flipping once halfway through. Note that the tofu will become chewier once cooled.

To assemble the sandwiches: Spread 1 tablespoon (14 g) mayonnaise on each side of the roll.

Place 1/3 cup (24 g) shredded lettuce on top.

Place 1 tofu slice on each sandwich and place 4 to 6 slices marinated eggplant on top.

Serve immediately.

Notes

Recipe from Vegan Sandwiches Save the Day by Celine Steen and Tamasin Noyes. Fair Winds Press 2012. Recipe published with kind permission from the author Celine Steen.

http://www.seitanismymotor.com/2015/09/marinated-eggpland-sandwich-vegan-sandwiches-save-the-day/

I know you think I am tricking you here. This doesn’t look quick, right? But it is! So welcome to today’s edition of Vegan Mofo 2015.

paper thin and crispy flammkuchen | Vegan Mofo 2015

Tarte flambée or flammkuchen, as it is called in German is a dish popular in Alsace, France and in the South of Germany. It’s a large topped flatbread that is prepared and served similar to pizza. There are a couple of important differences though. Traditionally tarte flambée is topped with crème fraîche, onions, and some kind of ham, bacon, or lardon. (I’ll never know the correct English term for this.)  The crust has to be rolled out paper thin, you want it to be really crispy. To achieve that the dough is made without any kind of leavening. No yeast and most definitely no baking powder. It’s also baked on a very high temperature. Because of the missing yeast and a high oven temperature the tarte only has to bake for a couple of minutes. The crust itself can be prepared in advance. The dough has to rest but it doesn’t need time to rise and it can be stored in the fridge for up to a week or even longer. For the topping you need very thinly sliced vegetables. Those can be prepared in advance, too. Simply place them in an airtight container and store in the fridge until ready to use. For this version I used red onions, leeks, and radishes. For a more traditional flammkuchen use onions and finely cubed smoked tofu instead.

paper thin and crispy flammkuchen | Vegan Mofo 2015

Thin and Crispy Tarte Flambée

Ingredients

For the crust
250 g (2 cups) all-purpose flour
4 g (1 leveled teaspoon) salt
1 tablespoon unsweetened soy yoghurt
1 tablespoon oil
120 ml (1/2 cup) water
For the crème fraîche
250 g (1 cup) unsweetened soy yoghurt
1 tablespoon finely chopped parsley or chives
1 tablespoon oil
1 teaspoon lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon salt or more, to taste
pepper to taste
For the topping
1 thinly sliced red onion
the white part of a thinly sliced leek
a couple of thinly sliced radishes

Instructions

To make the dough, combine flour and salt.

Add remaining ingredients and knead until the dough is firm and elastic, about 10 minutes.

Cover and let the dough rest for 30 minutes, or refrigerate until ready to use.

To make the crème fraîche, place all ingredients in a bowl and stir until combined.

To make the flammkuchen, place a baking sheet in the oven and preheat the oven to 250°C (480°F).

Divide the dough into four equally sized pieces and place each piece on a sheet of parchment paper.

Roll out as thin as possible. Let the dough rest and relax for a minute or two from time to time, so that rolling is easier.

Thinly spread with crème fraîche and top with vegetables.

Carefully remove the hot baking sheet from the oven and slide the sheet of parchment paper with the flammkuchen on the baking sheet.

Bake for about 8-10 minutes or until the edges are crispy.

Repeat with the other three pieces of dough and serve immediately.

http://www.seitanismymotor.com/2015/09/thin-and-crispy-tarte-flambee/

On Ash Wednesday Lent started. A long time ago that ment Catholics were advised to pray a lot, repent and give alms. It also ment to reduce or eschew the consumption of certain foods, for example meat. It seems that some people had clever ways to opt out of the meat abandonment though. They simply wrapped it in a piece of dough and pretended it didn’t happen. At least that is one of the food legends surrounding Maultaschen, the German version of ravioli. I grew up Catholic but this was more a tradition than a belief and we never observed Lent. But Maultaschen are delicious, no matter what, especially if they are meat free and nobody has to cheat. For this recipe you just have to hop over to All About Vegan Food, where you can find my contribution to their wonderful website.  You should also have a look at their Instagram feed or their facebook page for lots of vegan food inspiration. If you love Maultaschen but are not so much into smoked tofu, you can also try out my tempeh version here.

Since I write a German food blog in English I get many recipe requests from people who have German ancestors or relatives but do not live in Germany. It’s always very interesting to read about their motivation to recreate a certain dish. They sometimes tell me about their family members who made those dishes but never passed on the recipe. Often I have never heard about their version of a certain recipe. It’s fascinating how traditional German dishes or foods have changed through adaption, other ingredients, and preparation methods. For example pretzels. The first time I heard about the US tradition to serve pretzels with mustard I thought it was super weird. In Germany sausages like bratwurst are served with mustard. But definitely not pretzels. Pretzels are served with butter. The pretzel and mustard combination was invented, so I read, in Philadelphia where soft pretzels became popular in the 19th century. Another thing I found very interesting is the fact that the German pretzel always refers to the shape of the baked good. A pretzel  has to be pretzel shaped. In Northern America the name pretzel isn’t always linked to the shape though. Instead, it seems to me,  the name refers to the preparation method of baked goods brushed with lye. Everything that is brushed with lye and has the distinctive dark brown colour is called a pretzel, no matter which shape.