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Thursday

23

October 2014

10

COMMENTS

Poppy Seed Pull-Apart Bread

Written by , Posted in Bread, seeds, vegan

Poppy-Seed-Pull-Apart-Bread | www.seitanismymotor.com

When I was a kid I loved plasticine and fimo. I would build all kinds of things from modelling clay and for about two weeks I even had a very small fimo brooch kid business. (I sold the brooches for 50 pfennig a piece to my aunts.) I still like modelling stuff and so does my daughter. We build a lot of modelling clay animals. Baking with yeast dough is probably my way of finding a more grown up way to handle my plasticine addictions. I love the soft and smooth texture and all the different ways you can knead and cut it.

These pull-apart breads have been out there for quite a while. My version is inspired by Celine, who I test recipes for. She made a wonderful pull-apart bread for one of her new books. I love the technique used for this kind of bread, it’s similar to making cinnamon buns, but instead of rolling the dough up, you just cut it into stripes and stack it. Because there’s so much filling the baked bread is very moist and soft, and with its cinnamon and sugar filling, it’s the perfect comfort food. Well, not quite. Poppy seeds are a much-loved filling for Eastern- and Central-European pastries and who could argue with that? I have to admit that even though I do love a cinnamon roll once in a while, I would always prefer a poppy seed roll. And that’s why I put them in a filling for this delicious bread, too.

poppy seed pull-apart bread | www.seitanismymotor.com

Poppy Seed Pull-Apart Bread (makes one 22 cm or 9-inch loaf)

For the dough:
270 ml ( 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons) soy milk
55 g (1/4 cup) refined coconut oil
50 g (1/4 cup) sugar
420 g (3 1/3 cups) all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1/2 teaspoon salt

For the filling:
70 g (1/2 cup) poppy seeds, ground
2 tablespoons sugar
2 tablespoons hot water
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon cornstarch

Method:
Place soy milk in a small pot and add coconut oil. Heat gently until the oil has melted. Do not bring to a boil. Let cool until luke warm. Whisk in sugar.

In a large bowl mix flour, yeast, and salt. Add liquid ingredients and knead the dough until smooth, for about 5 minutes. It will probably still be sticky, but that’s okay. A stickier dough with more moisture will result in a fluffier loaf.

Let the dough rise in a warm place, until doubled in size, about an hour. (At this time of the year I put it into the oven and just leave the light on.)

Meanwhile prepare the filling:
Combine poppy seeds and sugar Add hot water and oil. Stir well until everything is combined. Stir in flour and starch.

Transfer the dough to a lightly floured working surface. Your dough should now be smooth and soft, if you feel it is still to sticky, add a tablespoon or two of flour. Roll the dough into a rectangle, 52 cm long and 26 cm wide. (20 x 10 inches) Place the wide side in front of you and spread the filling onto the dough, leaving a small 1 cm (0.5 inch) margin on all sides. Cut the dough into 8 26 cm (10 inch) long strips. Place four strips on top of each other and repeat with the remaining four strips so that you have two long stacked dough strips. Cut each stack into four rectangles.

Grease a 22 cm bread pan (9-inch loaf pan) with oil or line with parchment paper. Place the dough stacks int the pan. Cover with a damp kichen towel and let rise again for 30 minutes. Meanwhile preheat the oven to 200°C (400°F).

Bake the bread for 15 minutes, then reduce the temperature to 180°C (350°F) and bake for 25 more minutes or until the loaf is golden brown. Remove from oven and serve warm or let cool completely. The bread tastes best the day it’s made.

Kaffeedampf | www.seitanismymotor.com

Tuesday

21

October 2014

8

COMMENTS

Fragrant Apricot Chutney Two Ways

Written by , Posted in gluten-free, sauce, spread, vegan

apricot chutney | www.seitanismymotor.com

I never was a sweet and savoury or sweet and spicy person. Refusing to eat food which had both sweet and savoury components was my life task. I remember that a friend once wanted to try out a new recipe and she told me about making a sauce from cream and figs and eating that over pasta. I was pretty sure I would hate it. But she is one of my best friends and I didn’t want to be unpolite. So I objected only a tiny bit and told her I would try it. She was very exited about her dish, I couldn’t eat it.

I thought I would never change my mind about this. But I live with a person who loves everything sweet and sour, sweet and savoury, sweet and spicy. He hoards sweet and sour sauces and spicy, sweet chutneys. This summer, when apricots were in season I bought a huge box of this wonderful fruit and instead of putting all of the apricots into a cake I decided to make a chutney for P. And the most amazing thing is that we both loved it. Without even realising it, my taste has changed a tiny bit. No, I still do not love everything sweet and savoury, but I definitely do love chutney.

dried apricot chutney | www.seitanismymotor.com

I originally made this recipe for the vegan month of food, but since September was such a busy month I never mananged to publish it. The first version was made with fresh apricots but since they are clearly not in season anymore I made a second version with dried apricots. Both chutneys are quite different though. The fresh apricots blend with the spices, they provide structure and a fruity base, but they are clearly not as prominent as the dried ones with take the lead when it comes to taste. I don’t know which one I like better, I think that the one with the fresh fruit is a bit lighter and a bit more sour. It’s definitely a summer chutney, if there is such a thing. The one made with dried apricots is great for autumn as the apricots here add a very comforting and warm facet. And doesn’t it have a perfect autumn colour?

Recipe

Fresh Apricot Chutney
3 black cardamom pods
15 black peppercorns
3 cloves
3 dried allspice berries
1 teaspoon black mustard seeds
1 teaspoon coriander seeds
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
1 dried red chili
500 g (17.6 oz) fresh apricots, quartered
3 cherry tomatoes, quartered
150 g (3/4 cup) sugar
60 ml (1/4 cup) water
2 tablespoons white wine or apple cider vinegar
1 teaspoon fresh ginger, diced
1 teaspoon salt

Add all whole, dried spices to a medium sized pot and toast until they start to brown. Add remaining ingredients and bring to a boil. Cover and cook for 10 minutes. Reduce the heat and cover uncovered for about 20 more minutes, until thickened. Transfer to sterilised jars. Let cool completely and store in the fridge.

Dried Apricot Chutney

3 black cardamom pods
15 black peppercorns
3 cloves
3 dried allspice berries
1 teaspoon black mustard seeds
1 teaspoon coriander seeds
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
1 dried red chili
200 g (7 oz) dried unsulfured apricots, quartered
3 cherry tomatoes, quartered
125 g (1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons) sugar
120 ml (1/2 cup) white wine or apple cider vinegar
1 1/2 tablespoons tomato paste
1 teaspoon fresh ginger, diced
1 teaspoon garam masala
1/2 teaspoon hot madras curry powder
1 – 1 1/2 teaspoons salt

Add all whole, dried spices to a medium sized pot and toast until they start to brown.
Add remaining ingredients and add salt to taste. Bring to a boil and cook covered for 10 minutes. Remove lid and cook for 5 to 10 more minutes, or until thickened.Transfer to sterilised jars. Let cool completely and store in the fridge.

apricot chutney | www.seitanismymotor.com

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